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TVS Apache RR 310 Launch Ride Review

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Vikrant Singh

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Introduction

Not everyone can claim to have 35 years of racing pedigree. But when you do and you utilise it to develop a supersport, it certainly gets everyone’s attention. No wonder so many including us have been waiting with bated breath for the TVS Apache RR 310; also previously known as the TVS Akula. And it's priced at 2.05 lakh, which is a little more than we expected.

So, is it any good?

Well since we have only ridden it on the race track, we won’t be able to tell you about its everyday utility; or if its got a comfortable ride; or even if it runs cooler on commutes than most other single cylinder 300cc plus motorcycles.

But we will tell you this – the RR 310 is fantastic on a racetrack!

 

The specifications

More on that later. First lets talk specifications.

The Apache RR 310 uses the same BMW-TVS alliance platform as the BMW G 310 R. It uses the same chassis, the same engine, and even the brakes, the electricals and the suspension are almost the same.

So, the engine is a 313cc, liquid-cooled, fuel injected, single cylinder unit that makes 34bhp and around 28Nm of torque. The TVS does run a different ECU though. The gearbox is the same 6-speed unit with exactly the same ratios. However, the final drive on the RR is taller to achieve better top speed.

The chassis for the two bikes is an identical tubular unit. But the rear sub-frame on the RR is different to give it that tail-up stance. The suspension meanwhile - 41mm dia USD front forks and the preload adjustable monoshock – hasn’t changed. In fact, the tyres – 110-section front and 150-section rear, and the brakes – 300mm single disc upfront and 240mm disc at the rear, are the same as the G 310 as well.

So what one gets – and this completely depends on how you see it – are BMW parts on an Indian motorcycle!

The design

The big change on the TVS, however, is the design. And what a dramatic departure it is. The RR 310 looks stunning in the flesh. The proportions are spot-on, the silhouette is proper supersports, and the attention to detail on the TVS is class leading. The design is a lovely blend of smooth flowing surfaces and some edgy lines. Together, they catch the light beautifully. 

There’s good equipment on board the TVS as well. The RR is the first bike in its class to get all-LED head lamps. It also comes with dual channel ABS as standard. And its vertically stacked digital instrumentation has a sea of information. There are two trips, a distance to empty readout, instantaneous and average fuel consumption display, a clock, and for the truly enthusiastic lot, the RR 310 also shows the top speed and 0-60kmph acceleration data. Hazard lamps and a gearshift indicator are part of the console too. 

It’s also wonderfully put together. The plastic have a quality feel to them, the paint job is impressive, and it barely has any unfinished or rough edges to it. We might be taking a bit of a leap here, but the RR seems like one of the best in its class when it comes to quality.

The ride

But it’s the way the Apache RR 310 handles that really sets it apart. It doesn’t have the grippiest tyres in its class. It doesn’t have the sharpest steering geometry. And at almost 170kg, it’s also not the lightest bike in its segment. 

However, it still manages to deliver excellent handling characteristics. It turns or drops in to corners as if it weighs nothing at all. The same holds true when making quick direction changes. And the rate of lean isn’t stepped or abrupt; it’s one clean, linear motion. 

Plus, when it was banked over, not once did I feel that the tyres were lacking in any way. They just stuck to the tarmac even when I ended up grounding the pegs quite heavily. And the bike itself felt so planted everywhere; stable, manageable and forgiving, no matter how many mistakes I made.

The RR is one of those motorcycles that mask a rider’s flaw by its own engineering prowess. 

And two things really deserve credit here. The chassis that gives the RR a sense of tautness, and of course, the suspension which is so well tuned that it refuses to put the bike in a tizzy no matter what input it receives from the rider or the road.

The brakes, for most part, felt good too - be it power or progression. But on the track these did show significant signs of fade from time to time. 

As far as performance goes, the RR 310 doesn’t sound too dramatic. And with its power being delivered in less pronounced steps, it can mislead one into feeling that it’s slow. 

However, it is anything but that. 

Give it the stick and the speedo scales to three digits in no time. And it’s happy staying between 120-130kmph as long as the roads permit. The throttle response is immediate but not jerky; the engine is refined and free revving; and there’s decent grunt in the mid-range to give the bike potent, if not electric, corner exits. 

Our take

The TVS Apache RR 310 is certainly a bike I would have a good time with on a track. And I say that from experience. It has lovely handling, decent brakes and the engine has enough juice to make for a fast and entertaining ride. 

But what about its on road performance? Well, as we said at the start, we only rode the bike on the track. Nonetheless, I am willing to make some educated guesses here. For one, the seating ergonomics isn’t very demanding. It works on the track and it should work on commutes as well. 

The other concern, of course, is heat. Now, we will go with TVS’ claim here that the deflectors it uses as part of the front fairing actually force the engine heat to flow downwards than on to the rider’s legs. And so, the RR should be easy to live with on a daily basis. 

However, the proof of the pudding is in the eating. So, stay tuned for our upcoming comprehensive real world ride review of the Apache RR 310.

Photography by Kapil Angane

Gallery

TVS Apache RR 310 Action
TVS Apache RR 310 Side
TVS Apache RR 310 Engine
TVS Apache RR 310 Tank
TVS Apache RR 310 Front Wheel & Tyre
TVS Apache RR 310 Exhaust
TVS Apache RR 310 Seat
TVS Apache RR 310 Front Forks
TVS Apache RR 310 Badge
TVS Apache RR 310 Badge

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